Author Archive for PawSafe – Page 4

Finding that perfect gift for your pet….Priceless!!

Did you know that 63 percent of dog owners and 58 percent of cat owners give their pets gifts during the holiday season? Sometimes when owners buy gifts for their pets, they tend not take into account that a gift can be an opportunity to strengthen both their pets’ emotional and physical well-being as well as a means to increase their current pet/owner human/pet bond.  The Gloucester County Times (NJ), interviewed one man about how he celebrates Christmas with his golden retriever, Rue:  “She gets a pretty Christmas Eve outfit that she tugs and pulls off within 10 minutes,” he said. “That’s a $75 waste of money each year.” (http://business.time.com). An amazing pet that people dont think about is a guinea pig, you should buy a guinea pig for your child they would love one! Is just one of the types of not usual pets that people are getting now a days different from cats and dogs, people are getting snakes, ferrets or even teacup pigs who actually are adorable and easy to take care of.

This year when seeking out that perfect gift for your pet, ask yourself these two questions:

  • Can  this gift improve our relationship?
  • Does this gift help strengthen my pets emotional and physical well-being?

Keeping the above questions in mind will help you provide that perfect gift and that is …priceless.

Here are some suggestions to get you started:

  • Remember to schedule an annual wellness exam for your pet. An annual physical examination is one of most important gifts to help your pet live a longer, happier, and healthier life.
  • Do you or your pet get stressed thinking about going to the vet?  A good gift would then be to have your vet come to you.
  • Spay or neuter your pet. Spaying and neutering can provide major health benefits and helps to fight pet overpopulation.  If cost is an issue, consider finding a veterinarian who supports a Low-Cost Spay/Neuter program.
  • Does your dog suffer from cracked paws or dry noses during the winter?  Consider a product like Doggie Wellness BowWow Butter Balm.  Products like this significantly help those dogs whose paws and noses are more sensitive during drier weather.
  • Instead of buying packaged dog treats, think about making your own or get the best wet cat food or dog food.  The benefits of making your own treats are numerous.
  • Take your dog for a Reiki Treatment – Reiki is a form of spiritual healing that helps harmonize the mind, body, and soul of your pet.
  • Offer your dog a hydro massage with essential oils – These massages are designed to help our canine friends who may have joint, skin and/or relaxation issues.
  • Love to pamper your dog? How about treating her to a manicure complete with nail painting?
  • SHHHH…!!  The newest accessorizing trend for our dogs…feathers.  It’s not only for humans anymore…!
  • Having trouble bathing your dog in the winter?  Consider a do-it-yourself doggie wash to get the job done.
  • Looking for a way to give a gift to a friend or neighbor’s dog?  How about a gift certificate?  Gift certificates are a thoughtful way to help others pay for veterinary, grooming, training or any other service you think their pet may benefit.
  • Do you have difficulty finding the time to regularly exercise your dog?  Consider hiring a dog walker to help you out.
  • Is your dog is home alone for long periods of time?  Think about giving the gift mental and physical stimulation by bringing your dog to doggie daycare a few times per week.
  • Support fundraisers hosted by your local shelter and rescue organizations. Chances are you will probably find some fun items for your own pet.  It’s a win-win for everyone!
  • The gift that keeps on giving…make a donation to your local shelter in your pet’s name.
  • If emergency responders came to your home, would they know that you have animals inside?  Give the gift of safety and affix a pet alert sticker on all entrances to your home.
  • Would you know what to do in the event of a medical pet emergency? Take a Pet first aid course so that if you are ever faced with a pet medical emergency you will be more prepared.
  • Do you feel that your dog could be better behaved when out in public? Enroll your dog in a basic obedience class.  I recommend NFAH and will be leading these classes!! Our next session is scheduled to begin 1/16.  For more details call:203.312.9000.
  • Having difficulty with canine behaviors in your home?  Consider hiring TLC Dog Trainer!  Call 203.241.4449, visit my website @ www.tlcdogtrainer.com or check out my Facebook page – TLC Dog Trainer – you will see that I am equipped to help you with any behavioral issue that you may experiencing and can help you improve the current human-canine bond you have with your dog.

Still looking for that perfect gift for your pet?  
Listed below are some great companies who can help.  All of their products are manufactured in the USA and have recommended to me by clients or which I have personally used.

  • Sill Shields™ and Door Shields™ –  Designed to protect your window ledges and doors from being scratched and scuffed by doggie claws and paws. http://www.sillshield.com/
  • Poochie-Bells® – Easily and quickly train your pooch to ring the bell each time your dog needs to eliminate outdoors. http://poochie-pets.net/
  • Too Hot for Spot – This unique thermometer is designed to raise awareness of dog car safety and bring attention to the possible hazards of leaving pets in a vehicle during any season. http://www.dogcar.biz/
  • American Digs – American Digs is a premium brand of dog products and apparel. This company strives to provide products that dogs are proud to wear.   http://www.americandigs.com
  • Katies Bumpers Whether you are a serious dog trainer doing land or water work or you have a dog that loves to fetch, Katie’s Bumpers are great. http://www.katiesbumpers.com/
  • Ruff Dawg – Ruff Dawg has the right toy for your dog. These 100% superior-grade, rubber retrieving toys are made in the USA and are great for any size pooch. http://www.ruffdawg.com
  • Honest Pet Products Offers pet owners safe, quality made, truly NATURAL toys for their dogs and cats. http://honestpetproducts.com

Bottom-Line: The most important gift you can give your pet is making the time you spend together special.  Whether it be interacting with a toy, brushing your pet, or just hanging out, enjoy the time and find that gift which will assist in making your dog and the relationship you have with him the best it can be.

 

Donna Gleason – TLC Dog Trainer resides in Sherman, CT.  She is a certified professional dog trainer (CPDT-KA) with a Masters in Behavior Modification.  She offers professional in-home dog training (specializing in puppy education, basic obedience and behavior modification) as well as group puppy/basic obedience classes at New Fairfield Animal Hospital and her website https://petsho.com/best-dog-training-collar-shock-reviews/.  Donna is a member of APDT, Delta Society, Shelter Animal Reiki Association, Delta Society and consulting trainer for PawSafe Animal Rescue.  To reach Donna call 203.241.4449 or visit her website @ www.TLCDogtrainer.com

A Puppy Is NOT a Present

This Holiday Season, Remember: A Puppy Is NOT a Present

A dog should always be a considered choice and NEVER an impulse buy. Please help us spread the word about this during this high gift-giving season.

Janine Kahn  |  Nov 29th 2012    |  From Dogster

We all have them. The in-law who unapologetically keeps an “outside dog.” Or the friend who thought it was cool to let the family retriever shack up with the dog down the street so her kids could witness the “miracle of life.” Or the coworker who surprised his fiancee on her birthday with a Yorkie puppy from the pet store.

And let’s be honest: They make us feel like complete failures as responsible pet people. Yes, our own dogs went to puppy socials, play with lead-free toys, and were “fixed” at an appropriate age. But maybe we didn’t share that article on where pet store puppies come from enough on Facebook, or made our stance on the benefits of spay/neuter loud enough for those in our immediate networks to hear.

 

As the holidays approach, so does an opportunity to educate the people around us on a timely issue: that of puppies being given as holiday presents without too much though or planning beforehand. I don’t know about you, but I cringe inwardly when I see stock photos of dogs with bows strapped to their heads displayed in wrapped boxes beneath Christmas trees. It’s an image that’s readily accepted all over the world. But that doesn’t make it right.

Because a puppy should never be:

1. A novelty item. One that was a smash hit on Christmas morning, but an undesirable chore in the post-holiday world. A dog is at the very least a 10-year commitment, and if your intended recipients are not up to the task, you have no business gifting them with one, no matter how much they tell you they find Pomsky dogs cute and adorable.

2A stuffed toy. Some dogs might resemble one  but again, the responsibilities associated with toy vs. dog aren’t remotely in the same region. And if your daughter is obsessed with Pomeranians, there’s a stuffed animal replica you can buy her.

3. An imposition. Just because you thought a puppy would make a great gift doesn’t mean the recipient does. When your big “surprise” goes south, are you prepared to care for the pup for the rest of its days? We hope your backup plan doesn’t involve dumping him at the already-overcrowded local shelter.

4. An impulse buy. If your family isn’t up to the commitment, you can’t just return that puppy to the pet store. It’s not unusual for puppies returned to pet shops to be put down in horrendous ways, either. Please, please, please do your homework if you’re adding a dog to the family. Research dog breeds to find the best fit. Find a breed-specific rescue group or a reputable breeder if you must have a purebred. Or go to the shelter as a family and make an informed decision together.

To be clear: We are not opposed to you adding a dog to the family during the holiday season if the addition is one planned far in advance. We only ask that you make an informed decision and not a knee-jerk one that is bad for everyone down the line. This time of year is notorious for last-minute impulse buys, so I hope you understand the concern.

If you’re a regular Dogster reader, you probably already know these things. But it’s highly possible there are people you know who don’t. You can help us reach those people by sharing this article, or using the graphics below on your Facebook and/or Twitter feeds. We hope they’ll be a great conversation starter for your friends and family.

Sources-
http://www.petcheckers.co.uk/best-pet-insurance-reviews/

 

Pet Photos with Santa!

 

2013 PawSafe Calendar

It’s here and ready to be shipped!!

We’re so excited about our first ever PawSafe Calendar. It features amazing canine models that were all adopted through PawSafe. Full color stunning photography was done by none other than Tina Quatroni from Petcha.

 

Ready to order?




SmugMug features PawSafe as one of their Success Stories!

SmugMug Success Stories: PawSafe Animal Rescue

The Liberator: Putting the Doggy In the Window

Name: Diane Scuderi
Position/Title: Director
Name of Company: PawSafe Animal Rescue
Location: Patterson, NY
Market: Animal Rescue Nonprofit
Bragworthy Factoid: Saves the lives of more than 100 dogs/month
Website: http://pawsafe.smugmug.com
SmugMugger Since: 2008

Career Highlights…

  • Benchmark: saving 30 puppies every 2 weeks
  • Creating a rescue network that has placed thousands of animals into safe and loving homes
  • Raising $2,000 at their first fundraiser

Fave Features…

It’s a dog’s life

Scuderi’s underground railroad for abused animals began in 1995, when her then-husband brought home a pregnant cat that had been knocked around by a raccoon. Soon, her fervor to save animals led her to found PawSafe as a nonprofit and focus on canine rescue in the southern US. Sadly, the need for PawSafe has grown exponentially since then. “We’ll pull this cute chocolate Lab from a shelter in Virginia, and suddenly there’s another one. And another, and another,” Scuderi says. Modern communication tools help PawSafe hook up with local humane societies. “We align with other rescues already in an area. We have volunteers scattered around the country—people who donate their weekends to getting dogs to the receiving leg of a rescue.” PawSafe targets so-called high-kill shelters, operating a mass transfer every other week. Scuderi’s network picks up animals, brings them to a kennel, boards them, fosters them out and arranges medical care. “Then,” she says grimly, “we do it all again.” Some people just prefer dogs over cats, because they say they’re smarter, and cleaner, cats are harder to train to do some necessities, but with CatLitterExpert you won’t have to worry about that and you could have the pet of your choice, if you own a cat you have to make sure to check out the Top 10 Best Cat Foods – Ultimate Buyer’s Guide just because you should feed your pets only with the best.

SmugMug to the rescue

PawSafe calls its adoptee gallery “Getting Ready to Meet You.” Thanks to SmugMug, it’s a beautiful, welcoming and easily navigable place to find the pet of your dreams. “We love the sharing feature, as it lets us shoot [pet-seekers] a sneak peek of the animals we’re readying for adoption,” Scuderi says. “We probably use this feature more than any other.” Sharing photos via a respected host is important to Scuderi. “Our photo galleries and archives give our adopters a sense we’ve been around—that we’re permanent,” she says. “If you adopt and can’t keep the dog, you can bring it back, some business like ones you find here have said to look at these pictures before adopting. We have photographic records from 2006 on, emails posted as testimonials, etc.” SmugMug technology allows volunteers in shelters to snap a dog on death row, email the photo privately and get an answer about rescue space in the north quickly and efficiently. “This also captures the inspiring side of galleries,” Scuderi adds. “It just grows and grows—scrolling pages of dogs we’ve rescued.”

Doggone recession

Financial constraints, economically driven surrenders and the rising price of gas have put the squeeze on Scuderi’s operation. The relationship with SmugMug has helped make the most of limited resources. “SmugMug helped PawSafe establish an Internet presence early on in the game, before websites were popular with animal rescues,” she says. The first one is highly recommended. “Not only that, if we ever have a question, they give us support.” Sadly, a tough economy tends to boost the flow of animals, as otherwise attentive dog owners are forced to surrender pets due to job or home loss. Older animals and larger breeds are even harder to place, Scuderi says. Once a dog is adopted, it holds a place of honor in the “adopted” section, hosted on SmugMug. “It is the adopted dogs and puppies section that we promote and are most proud of,” Scuderi says. “We also have that gallery linked as a WordPress plug-in to our website.”

Shooting for adoption

PawSafe’s photographers have developed best practices for this unique photographic form. Often, pictures are snapped quickly in shelters, under less-than-ideal circumstances. They focus on the animal’s eyes, trying to highlight the dog’s essential goodness and sparkle. Although they aim to keep people out of the photos—final screen real estate is a half-inch thumbnail on Petfinder—they sometimes include a child’s hand touching the dog’s head, or something else that captures the dog’s spirit. They never forget that the animal’s life is on the line. “You have to do something in that icon size to make the dog jump off the page,” Scuderi says.

Biting off more to chew

For the time being, PawSafe’s team is investing in the organization’s future. For example, PawSafe now has two volunteers seeking grants, and just finished its first fundraiser (netting $2,000). Their goal? To build a shelter facility of their own within four years. “People think an adoption fee of $400 is high,” Scuderi says. “It seems high until you ask a vet how much it costs to spay, vaccinate, get a health certificate, etc. We do extensive medical. There are lots of laws governing transferring dogs state to state. We mostly break even, even on a healthy puppy.” If you suffer of any health issues such as anxiety buy kratom at kratomcrazy.com to get help.

(Read the full post here:

http://news.smugmug.com/2012/10/15/smugmug-success-stories-pawsafe-animal-rescue/)

Are you prepared for a pet health emergency?

Are you prepared for a pet health emergency?

According to www.dictionary.com an emergency is “a sudden, urgent, usually unexpected occurrence or occasion requiring immediate action”.   If you have ever been in an emergency – especially involving your pet, without any sort of pet insurance – you quickly learn the more prepared you are, the better equipped you will be in handling the situation.

 

Imagine coming home to, “Mom I’ve been trying to call you,  Winston just ate a whole bottle of Lucy’s (my other dog’s) pain medication….”  Unfortunately, that is exactly what happened this week.  So based on my recent experience with Winston and information from the experts, here are some tips designed to make you even more prepared if ever faced with a pet health emergency.

  1. Keep the name and phone numbers of your regular veterinarian and 24/7 emergency veterinary hospital (including directions) in a location that is easily accessible and have some home remedies for kennel cough at hand –  some suggestions are to have all the information posted on the refrigerator, programmed in your car’s GPS and into your smartphone.
  2. Listed below are three 24/7 emergency veterinary hospitals located in the Sherman/New Fairfield area.
  • Newtown Veterinary Specialists
    52 Church Hill Rd.
    Newtown, CT 06470,
    Phone:  203.790.6383
  • Veterinary Specialty Center of the Hudson Valley (did a great job with Mr. Winston)
    1285 U.S. Route 9
    Wappingers Falls, NY 12590
    Phone: 845.632.3200
  • Katonah Bedford Veterinary Center
    546 N. Bedford Road (Route 117)
    Bedford Hills, NY
    Phone:  914.241.7700
  1. Have the number of a 24/7 Poison Control Center readily available in your home (there will be a fee charged for this service).
  1. Pet Poison Helpline 800-213-6680
  2. ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center   1.888.426.4435
  1. If you are transporting your pet to the veterinarian with an emergency always alert the staff that you in route.  This way the medical team will be ready to take action the moment you enter their facility.  When Winston and I arrived at New Fairfield Animal Hospital the staff was waiting, had all the proper medications ready and began treating him right away.  We saved valuable minutes, which are critical when facing a life or death situation.

 

Prepare a pet first aid kit:  Having a few items in a handy place is a great idea for dealing with a pet health emergency.  According to Mary Oquendo, Master Pet Tech First Aid Instructor, the items listed below should be part of every standard first aid kit.

  • Non-stick gauze pads
  • Gauze rolls
  • Cotton balls or swabs
  • Adhesive tape
  • Scissors with blunt ends
  • Antibiotic cream
  • Antiseptic wipes
  • Blanket (foil emergency blanket) for warmth or to assist with transport
  • Sealed sterile saline solution – once the bottle is opened it is no longer sterile.
  • Plastic cards such as old library or used gift cards – they are the perfect size to cushion pad injuries. You can also use them to flick out bee stingers. Place the card under the stinger and lift up and out.
  • Chemical cold packs or instant cold gel packs
  • Large Syringe (no needle) for flushing wounds or administering medicine. Handy hint:  A squirt bottle or turkey baster can be used in place of a syringe
  • Current medical information about your dog – including proof of rabies vaccination, current blood work, medications and any medical issues your dog may be experiencing.

In Mary’s on-demand webinar, Making and Using A Pet First Aid Kit,  you will learn how to put together a more comprehensive first aid kit and how to use the contents stored inside.  For more information go to http://www.pawsitiveeducationaltraining.com

Bottom Line: Cindy Smith, staff manager at New Fairfield Animal Hospital sums it up:  When facing a health emergency with your pet, it’s important to get to the veterinarian as quickly as possible.  Do not waste time trying to diagnose your pet’s condition by going on-line, call your vet and describe the situation.  In a true emergency the difference between the life or death of your pet could be a matter of minutes.  Finally, If you ever have to transport your sick or injured pet to a veterinary hospital, make sure the staff is aware that you are on your way – just as in Winston’s case – the team can be waiting and have everything ready to begin treatment the moment you arrive.

As for Mr. Winston his 48 hour blood test just came back normal and we are hoping that his  second set of results will deliver the same news.

 

Donna Gleason – TLC Dog Trainer resides in Sherman, CT.  She is a certified professional dog trainer (CPDT-KA) with a Masters in Behavior Modification.  She offers professional in-home dog training (specializing in puppy education, basic obedience and behavior modification) as well as group puppy/basic obedience classes at New Fairfield Animal Hospital.  Donna is a member of APDT, Delta Society, Shelter Animal Reiki Association, Delta Society and consulting trainer for PawSafe Animal Rescue.  To reach Donna call 203.241.4449 or visit her website @ www.TLCDogtrainer.com

 

 

 

 

PawSafe Animal Rescue Supporters Make Great Dog Sitters at Rover.com!

We think supporters of PawSafe Animal Rescue and good old-fashioned dog lovers everywhere make great dog sitters. That’s why we’ve partnered with Rover.com on a new program called Sit a Dog, Save a Life™.

It’s a great way for dog lovers to raise money for PawSafe Animal Rescue, save dogs’ lives, and make some additional money for yourself.

Here’s how it works:

Sign up to become a dog sitter on Rover.com

As a Rover Dog sitter, you get to set your own rates and schedule and choose the dog(s) you want to care for. You can also choose to care for a dog in your own residence, or do some dog sitting at another’s home. Dog sitters on Rover.com typically make $25 to $50 per dog, per day, and no experience or licensing is necessary — just a love of dogs!

 

Supporters of PawSafe Animal Rescue can choose to donate a portion of their profits directly to PawSafe Animal Rescue. When you do this, your Rover profile will display a “PawSafe Animal Rescue Donor” badge, so that others can see that you are committed to supporting their organization and help make life worth barking about for our canine friends (note: Rover.com will deduct your donation from your sitter profits and send it directly to PawSafe Animal Rescue).

 

Find great dog sitters on Rover.com

By utilizing great local pet sitters who’ve decided to donate to PawSafe Animal Rescue, you will help our efforts to save dogs’ lives in our area. Go to Rover.com, select your zip code, and look for Rover sitters with the “PawSafe Animal Rescue Donor” badge!

So if you’re looking to turn your love of dogs into support for PawSafe Animal Rescue, try dog sitting at Rover.com. And if you’re looking for a dog sitter, check out a caring Rover.com dog sitter who has pledged to donate a portion of their profits to PawSafe Animal Rescue. We’d really appreciate it!

Please note: In order for PawSafe Animal Rescue to receive charitable donations from Rover dog sitters, payments for dog sitter services must be booked and transacted on the Rover.com website.

 

Rescue, Donate, Volunteer and Foster

Rescue, Donate, Volunteer and Foster

“Approximately 5 million to 7 million companion animals enter animal shelters nationwide every year, and approximately 3 million to 4 million are euthanized (60 percent of dogs and 70 percent of cats).” – ASPCA

There’s a tale used by some rescue and shelter organizations intended to put the above statistic into perspective.  Although you can find many variations of this story on the internet, the message is always the same.  It is about a man who walks the beach and tosses the starfish that have washed upon the shore back into the ocean.  One day he was asked why he did this as there were miles of beach and numerous starfish along each mile.  How could this possibly make a difference?  As the man bends down to toss another starfish into the ocean, he replies, “It made a difference for this one.”

Logically we know one person can t save all of the 5 – 7 million companion animals that enter  shelter and rescue organizations, but there are opportunities for everyone to make a difference in the life of one.  Let’s look at some of those ways:

 VOLUNTEER

Misconception:  “I can’t volunteer, I am not comfortable working directly with the animals.”

Reality:   There are many volunteer opportunities within any shelter or rescue organization that does not involve direct contact with animals.”

  1. Help design and maintain a monthly newsletter
  2. Volunteer in the office (answering phones, filing etc)
  3. Arrange and participate in fundraising events
  4. Website maintainance
  5. Put together informational packets for new adopters
  6. Assist in screening new adopters
  7. Handyman work around the facility
  8. Landscaping and gardening

 

DONATE

Misconception:  “Shelter and rescue organizations are only looking for financial donations.”

Reality:  While cash donations are always appreciated, the supplies needed for the day to day operations are just as important.

Note:  To determine which items your favorite shelter/rescue organization is in need of, take time to visit their website.

  1. Towels
  2. Blankets
  3. Dog or cat food
  4. Litter
  5. Laundry detergent
  6. Newspaper
  7. Food dishes
  8. Cat and dog beds


FOSTER

Misconception:  “Fostering is only for children.”

Reality:  Did you know that you can work with your local shelter or rescue organization and temporarily foster one of their companion animals within your home?

Many times there is a screening process that occurs prior to fostering a shelter or rescue animal in your home.  However, once approved, the overall goal would be to assist in preparing the animals from the shelter into their forever home.

 

ADOPT

Misconception:  “Most shelter animals are not good pets, that Is why they end up in the shelter.”

Reality:   According to the Humane Society of the United States the most common scenarios as to why animals end up in shelters are due to “people reasons” as opposed to behavioral issues.

  1. Their owners have passed away
  2. A divorce
  3. Owners have to move
  4. Owners did not spay or neuter their pets and could not keep the litter of puppies
  5. Owners did not have enough time to take care of their pet.
  6. Owners could not take care of their pet financially

 

Bottom-Line:  As you can see, there are many opportunities in which you can help your local rescue or shelter organization.  Now it’s up to you to find that special way to make that difference in the life of one.

 

Donna Gleason – TLC DogTrainer resides in Sherman, CT. 
She is a certified professional dog trainer (CPDT-KA) with a Masters in Behavior Modification.  She offers professional in-home dog training (specializing in puppy education, basic obedience and behavior modification) and group puppy/basic obedience classes.  Donna is a member of APDT, Delta Society, Shelter Animal Reiki Association, Good Dog Foundation and consulting trainer for Paw-Safe Animal Rescue.  To reach Donna call 203.241.4449 or visit her website @ www.TLCDogtrainer.com